News-front

Old oak trees are nature's service station and full of drama

Old oak trees are nature's service station and full of drama

Old oak trees are very important for biodiversity, contribute to higher ecosystem functions and may play a vital role in controlling pests in agriculture, according to a new PhD from NMBU.

Aiming to use bacteria to produce animal feed, medicine and plastics

Aiming to use bacteria to produce animal feed, medicine and plastics

A new method for using bacteria to produce anything from plastic to animal feed is in the works at NMBU. "This is truly a completely new invention," says researcher and project manager Linda Bergaust.

Young people struggle when there is no definitive answer

Young people struggle when there is no definitive answer

Teenagers are good at finding a solution through discussion, but struggle when it emerges that they may not be right. ‘That surprises us,’ says Ingrid Eikeland.

Curt Rice is NMBU’s next rector

Curt Rice is NMBU’s next rector

The university board has appointed Curt Rice as NMBU’s next rector. – The board means Rice is the right person to lead the work on developing and realizing NMBUs ambitious strategy as the university for sustainability, says chair Siri Hatlen. Rice starts the job on 1st August. 

Reforming human-impacted landscapes beneath the surface of the Oslofjord

Reforming human-impacted landscapes beneath the surface of the Oslofjord

Using art, landscape architecture and ecology, Norway’s first waterscape architect creates a broad awareness of the underwater impacts of development along our coastlines and offers innovative solutions.

How robots find the best food

How robots find the best food

Robots that pick the finest berries, and sensors that find the best and healthiest raw produce. New technology will provide us with better food at cheaper prices.

 

Wooden panels protect houses from earthquake damage

Wooden panels protect houses from earthquake damage

Norwegian solid-wood structures can protect Italian cities from earthquake damage. A European research project shows how concrete buildings can be reinforced with wood to prevent them from collapsing when an earthquake strikes.

 

From displaced children to criminal gang members

From displaced children to criminal gang members

How do youngsters forced onto the street by violence and poverty go from being considered vulnerable, displaced minors to feared criminals?

How can police build trust with communities to improve security in post-conflict regions?

How can police build trust with communities to improve security in post-conflict regions?

An NMBU-led study on community oriented policing spanning 12 countries and 4 continents is now complete. Here’s what it found.

Mouldy food? No thanks!

Mouldy food? No thanks!

The technology will ensure that the food that ends up on your table is safe to eat, even before it leaves the farm. The solution is a simple, portable device that quickly scans the food and identifies mould, pesticides and antibiotics.

Global development studies at NMBU awarded top mark by international committee

Global development studies at NMBU awarded top mark by international committee

‘This recognition shows that our programme in Global Development Studies is at a high international level,’ says professor Morten Jerven.

Why projects to adapt to climate change backfire

Why projects to adapt to climate change backfire

A review led by the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) and the University of Oxford has found that rather than reducing vulnerability to climate change, many internationally-funded adaptation projects reinforce, redistribute or create new sources of vulnerability in developing countries. 

NMBU professor Siri Eriksen among the ‘most cited ever’ in top environmental studies journal

NMBU professor Siri Eriksen among the ‘most cited ever’ in top environmental studies journal

The article features in the journal’s top 20 papers in the last 20 years.

Large-scale forest-based biofuels may significantly change the forest sector

Large-scale forest-based biofuels may significantly change the forest sector

There are enough biomass resources available to meet the Nordic demand for biofuels and bioheat. Increased production of biofuel will change the traditional forest sector, and the forest owners stand to gain.

Outdoor spaces and nature combat depression during COVID-19

Outdoor spaces and nature combat depression during COVID-19

New research verifies that governments should allow people to spend time outdoors to protect mental health in the event of new lockdown measures.

Peacebuilding starts with a seed

Peacebuilding starts with a seed

“It’s important that the Nobel Committee does not contribute to making food a security issue”, says NMBU researcher Ola Westengen about the World Food Program’s Nobel Peace Prize in 2020.

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale

Findings will help wildlife managers track and predict the dynamics of large carnivore populations.

Fish on four wheels

Fish on four wheels

Will tomorrow’s fish feed grow on trees? 450 small fish in seawater tanks by the Oslo Fjord will hopefully bring us a little closer to the answer.

Gas-fuelled cooking can save lives

Gas-fuelled cooking can save lives

Switching from wood and charcoal-fuelled cooking to gas may save lives, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase welfare in developing countries, says new Multiconsult/Noragric study.

Sustainable bioeconomy vital for freshwater resources

Sustainable bioeconomy vital for freshwater resources

If the bioeconomy with its utilisation of renewable land-based biomass does not develop in a sustainable way, the alterations of the rural landscape, in combination with expected climate change, will seriously affect our freshwater resources.

NMBU’s Professor emerita Brit Salbu knighted

NMBU’s Professor emerita Brit Salbu knighted

“The knighthood is a major recognition of Salbu’s fantastic effort in the service of science over several decades. Salbu’s research has been decisive in shaping better risk assessments tied to radioactive radiation and environmental toxins,” says NMBU Rector Sjur Baardsen.

Lake Detective: The hunt for the lakes of the past

Lake Detective: The hunt for the lakes of the past

Algae blooms in lakes are a common sight, especially in summer. An NMBU researcher is digging into the past to find out if climate change and human activities affect the occurrence of algae in lakes.

COVID19 and climate change resilience

COVID19 and climate change resilience

What do our responses to COVID-19 suggest about society’s ability to transform in the context of climate change? New study with NMBU's Department of Public Health Science.

Urban paddling pools as sources of life

Urban paddling pools as sources of life

With small adjustments, landscape architects and developers can facilitate life and biodiversity in urban ponds. A small insect that has survived the dinosaurs is the key.

Taking architecture underwater

Taking architecture underwater

Lawns and parks on land – concrete and desert underwater. Elin T. Sørensen is doing a PhD on landscapes created by people under the surface of the sea. She is Norway’s first waterscape architect.

Pages