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Plasma lipopolysaccharide is closely associated with glycemic control and abdominal obesity evidence from bariatric surgery

Plasma Lipopolysaccharide Is Closely Associated With Glycemic Control and Abdominal Obesity: Evidence from bariatric surgery

We have shown that the amount of bacterial DNA in fat tissue is correlated with obsity. The findings have been highlighted on the front page in Dagbladet and in www.MDLinx.com. The article was published in Diabestes Care with an impact factor of 7.73.

Plasma lipopolysaccharide is closely associated with glycemic control and abdominal obesity evidence from bariatric surgery

OBJECTIVEIt is of vital importance to elucidate the triggering factors of obesity and type 2 diabetes to improve patient care. Bariatric surgery has been shown to prevent and even cure diabetes, but the mechanism is unknown. Elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) predict incident diabetes, but the sources of LPS are not clarified. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential impact of plasma LPS on abdominal obesity and glycemic control in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis was a prospective observational study involving a consecutive sample of 49 obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery and 17 controls. Main assessments were plasma LPS, HbA1c, adipose tissue volumes (computed tomography), and quantified bacterial DNA in adipose tissue compartments.RESULTSPlasma levels of LPS were elevated in obese individuals compared with controls (P < 0.001) and were reduced after bariatric surgery (P = 0.010). LPS levels were closely correlated with HbA1c (r = 0.56; P = 0.001) and intra-abdominal fat volumes (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), but only moderately correlated with subcutaneous fat volumes (r = 0.33; P = 0.038). Moreover, there was a decreasing gradient (two-fold) in bacterial DNA levels going from mesenteric via omental to subcutaneous adipose tissue compartments (P = 0.041). Finally, reduced LPS levels after bariatric surgery were directly correlated with a reduction in HbA1c (r = 0.85; P < 0.001).CONCLUSIONSOur findings support a hypothesis of translocated gut bacteria as a potential trigger of obesity and diabetes, and suggest that the antidiabetic effects of bariatric surgery might be mechanistically linked to, and even the result of, a reduction in plasma levels of LPS.

Read more:
Troseid, M., T. K. Nestvold, K. Rudi, H. Thoresen, E. W. Nielsen, and K. T. Lappegard. 2013. Plasma Lipopolysaccharide Is Closely Associated With Glycemic Control and Abdominal Obesity: Evidence from bariatric surgery. Diabetes Care.

Published 27. June 2014 - 9:30 - Updated 23. May 2017 - 19:33