News

KBM-postdoc to organize science workshop for Spanish-speaking children

KBM-postdoc to organize science workshop for Spanish-speaking children

As part of her MSCA postdoctoral fellowship at KBM, Sara Arbulu is organizing an outreach workshop in Oslo on June 12 through the Native Scientist initiative. 

Could animal fats be healthy?

Welcome to the final open meeting for NFR project number 281297 LIPIDINFLAMMAGENES, 15 September 2022. 

Widely used food additive affects the human gut microbiota

Widely used food additive affects the human gut microbiota

An additive used in processed food leads to changes in our gut bacteria, according to new research from NMBU. Researchers say it is time for new assessments of additives used in foodstuffs.

NMBU-professor new chair of Arctic research network

NMBU-professor new chair of Arctic research network

Professor Roland Kallenborn from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) is appointed UArctic Chair in Arctic Environmental Pollution Research for the next five years.

NMBU research gives new opportunities for recirculating plastics (and more)

NMBU research gives new opportunities for recirculating plastics (and more)

Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases (LPMOs) are unique mono-copper enzymes evolved to act on the surfaces of insoluble crystalline polysaccharides, such as cellulose. 

Knitting scientist explains Covid-19-numbers at UNESCO art exhibition

Knitting scientist explains Covid-19-numbers at UNESCO art exhibition

When statistician Kathrine Frey Frøslie explained the R-number using crochet, the video went viral in Norway. Her knitted and crocheted corona art is now available in English, and on display in an international corona exhibition from UNESCO.

New database solves bottleneck in use of metagenome sequencing for human gut microbiome studies

New database solves bottleneck in use of metagenome sequencing for human gut microbiome studies

The first publication based on the comprehensive HumGut microbiome database has now been published in the leading scientific journal Microbiome. 

Aiming to use bacteria to produce animal feed, medicine and plastics

Aiming to use bacteria to produce animal feed, medicine and plastics

A new method for using bacteria to produce anything from plastic to animal feed is in the works at NMBU. "This is truly a completely new invention," says researcher and project manager Linda Bergaust.

Required fire drills in Svalbard pollute Arctic waters

Required fire drills in Svalbard pollute Arctic waters

Large volumes of residues from aqueous fire-fighting foam from the airports in Longyearbyen and Ny-Ålesund contaminate drainage water and pollutes the local marine environment. 

Do you believe you are gluten intolerant? You could be mistaken

Do you believe you are gluten intolerant? You could be mistaken

More and more people are cutting out wheat from their diet. Many believe that they are gluten intolerant, but they may be reacting to something completely different in the wheat. Tora Asledottir is finding types of wheat that they can actually eat.

A game changer in biomass degradation and bacterial pathogenesis

A game changer in biomass degradation and bacterial pathogenesis

Pathogenic bacteria use different strategies to overcome the host immune responses. To this end, an enzyme discovered by NMBU researchers ten years, which revolutionised the field of biomass degradation, has been shown to be important in multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis.

New findings on how pathogenic baceria protect against our immune system

New findings on how pathogenic baceria protect against our immune system

Enzymes previously known for their ability to break down biomass are also important for how bacteria defend themselves against our immune system, NMBU researchers show in a new study published in Nature Communications.

Professor Thore Egeland wins prestigious award for research and education

Professor Thore Egeland wins prestigious award for research and education

Professor Thore Egeland was awarded an international research and education prize for significant contributions in the field of forensic genetics. His achievements include co-developing the familial relationship statistics software Familias, and his dedication in providing biostatistical training workshops.

Under winter's spell: how trees slumber until spring

Under winter's spell: how trees slumber until spring

In temperate and boreal regions, trees depend on a period of dormancy to survive the cold depths of winter. Scientists have cracked the code determining how trees enter and exit their dormant state.

Groundbreaking collaboration for more sustainable aquaculture

Groundbreaking collaboration for more sustainable aquaculture

A new consortium of industry, researchers, and innovators will further develop a knowledge base with digital models of the salmon’s body. This can lead to more sustainable aquaculture in the future.

Making sense of numbers with simrel, one byte at a time

Making sense of numbers with simrel, one byte at a time

According to Raju Rimal, eating an elephant and completing a PhD are both best tackled one bite (or byte) at a time. Raju successfully defended his PhD thesis, "Exploration of Multi-Response Multivariate Methods". He extended the statistical R-package simrel to create a simulation tool for multi-response data, and discovered that new envelope methods often perform well.

Statistics wrapped in a poncho

Statistics wrapped in a poncho

As part of the national Research Days, NMBU hosts a science show for 10th graders, introducing them to different concepts and possibilities in the sciences. This year, statistician Kathrine Frey Frøslie took the stage to discuss the importance of vaccination programs, and the mathematics behind the spread of disease.