Course code MINA410

MINA410 Environmental Radiobiology

Norsk emneinformasjon

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Showing course contents for the educational year starting in 2017 .

Course responsible: Deborah Helen Oughton
Teachers: Carmel Mothersill, Colin Brian Seymour
ECTS credits: 5
Department: Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management
Teaching language: EN
(NO=norsk, EN=Engelsk)
Limits of class size:
-
Teaching exam periods:
This course starts in June block. This course has teaching/evaluation in August block, June block.
Course frequency: Even years. The course is offered next in 2018.
First time: 2010H
Preferential right:
-
Course contents:
The course is based on a weeks intensive lectures. Students are expected to have read and prepared from the pensum beforehand. One afternoon will include lab demonstration of some of the biomarker methods. An additional indepth self-study on a selected topic will be required for the written assignment. The course is held every other year - next scheduled June 2018
Learning outcome:
The aim of the course is to give students an introduction to the fundamental principles of radiobiology, within the context of research fields on radioecology and the environmental effects of radiation. As such the course will cover both the history and the state-of-the-art of our knowledge on the biological effects of radiation on humans, and how this relates to other effects seen in non-human organisms. Areas covered include fundamental radiobiology, biological responses to ionising radiation, the use of biomarkers and toxicogenomics, factors linked to differences in radiation sensitivity, non-targeted effects (bystander, genomic instability, adaptive response, etc.,) and multiple stressors.
Learning activities:
This course will examine current radiobiology after introducing a historical perspective. The various concepts of radiobiology (such as target theory) will be introduced as problems for the class to discuss. Following the class discussion and the production of a hypothesis, the classical solutions and work in this area will be discussed. Repetition of this approach will allow students to become immersed in the topic, and will encourage them to derive the fundamental tenets of radiobiology for themselves. Using this approach to radiobiology also allows the natural flow towards modern paradigm shifts, and the view that radiation should not be regarded in isolation in terms of environmental stress. The course will then deal with the interaction between radiobiology and radioecology and in particular how the new radiobiological paradigms involving concepts of non-targeted effects mechanisms such as genomic instability and bystander effects, may alter the fundamental tenets on which radiation and environmental protection are based. Attention will also be paid to conflicts this raises between scientific and legislative approaches to radiation, and some examples from Canada will be discussed.
Teaching support:
-
Syllabus:

Course book:

Eric Hall 'Radiobiology for the Radiologist'

 

Selected articles (available as a compendium)from:

Essentials of Environmental Toxicology, by W Hughes, publ Taylor and Francis

 

In vitro methods in aquatic toxicology Mothersill and Austin -#8211- publ Praxis Fundamentals of Aquatic Toxicology Rand, publ Taylor and Francis

 

Multiple stressors a challenge for the future, Proc. NATO ARW eds Mothersill, Mosse and Seymour Publ Springer

Prerequisites:
Basic principles of radiation protection (eg. KJM350 or similar)
Recommended prerequisites:
Mandatory activity:
Lectures (80% attendance) Written assignment
Assessment:
The students will prepare a written assignment on a choice of topics. The assigment will require self-study and should be handed in 3 weeks after completion of the lectures
Nominal workload:
The course is based on a weeks intensive lectures. Students are expected to have read and prepared from the pensum beforehand. One afternoon will include lab demonstration of some of the biomarker methods. An additional indepth self-study on a selected topic will be required for the written assignment.
Entrance requirements:
Minimum requirements for entrance to higher education in Norway (generell studiekompetanse)
Reduction of credits:
-
Type of course:
25 hrs lectures, 25 hrs preparation/self-study, 100 hrs written assignment
Note:
-
Examiner:
External examiner will control the quality of the assigments
Examination details: Term paper: Bestått / Ikke bestått

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