Course code EDS426

EDS426 Extraction ethnographies

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Showing course contents for the educational year 2022 - 2023 .

Course responsible: Esben Leifsen
ECTS credits: 5
Faculty: Faculty of Landscape and Society
Teaching language: EN
(NO=norsk, EN=Engelsk)
Limits of class size:
15
Teaching exam periods:
Spring 2023.
Course frequency: This course will be given only once. 
First time: Study year 2022-2023
Last time: 2023V
Preferential right:
PhD candidates enrolled in a programme at LANDSAM will be prioritised.
Course contents:

The course invites PhD candidates interested in combining conceptual approaches with field-based research on extractive activities related to the non-renewable carbon-based economy, and/or to renewable initiatives and proposals related to the green transition and the emerging bioeconomy. This encompasses research on activities related to mineral and energy production, and bio-resources, and more specifically on the extraction of materials, substances, value, information, and digital data from the geo- and biospheres.

Analytical and methodological possibilities of what in an extended sense could be considered ‘extraction ethnographies’ are explored. This entails research that focuses processes of resource transformation, circulation and appropriation by connecting sites, following traces and empirically studying the politics of up (- or down) scaling in particular cases across contexts associated with the Global South and North.

The course draws on a diverse body of scholarly work at the intersections of social studies of science, technology and medicine, environmental anthropology and political ecology, and with a specific interest in decolonial theory, infrastructure and data studies, feminist technoscience studies and environmental humanities. Conceptually and methodologically the course foregrounds actor network theory and material semiotics, including recent research into the theorizing of geo-social relations as well as material and more-than-human dimensions producing as well as produced in extractivist practice.

This PhD course is a collaboration between the STS group at the TIK Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture at the University of Oslo, and the RAPID Rights, Accountability and Power in Development research cluster at the Department of International Environment and Development Studies, NMBU.  

Learning outcome:

Participants will learn to:

- become familiar with the inter-disciplinary field of social studies of science, technology and medicine, political ecology, and environmental anthropology.

-  engage with cutting-edge conceptual and methodological developments that are relevant for studying extractions.

-  be able to contribute empirically and analytically to conceptualizing extractions across sites and locations (mining, valuation, digital).

-  work at different scales with ethnographic and other empirical materials.

Learning activities:
The course involves lectures, student presentations, discussions, group work and writing. Participants are expected to submit a written draft that will be circulated among course participants. This should be work in progress (4000-5000 words), not a finished manuscript. The paper could be an empirically-based analysis, such as work toward a dissertation chapter or article draft. During the course, participants will discuss, receive and give feedback on pre-circulated drafts.
Teaching support:
Discussions and feedback between students, course organizers, and participating guest lecturers.
Syllabus:
Selected articles and bookchapters.
Prerequisites:
Participants should be enrolled in a PhD programme and have a basic understanding of social theory and qualitative research before joining the course. Other backgrounds especially relevant to the topic and the approach of the course might be accepted and will be evaluated on an individual basis. 
Recommended prerequisites:
Mandatory activity:

Required activities for the fulfilment of the course:

-     Submit and present a course paper prior to course start.

-     Attend the entire course (1 week).

-     Read course literature.

-     Read all papers and act as main discussant for another paper.

-     Take active part in discussions during the course.

Assessment:
Participants have to complete all required activities in order to pass. Participants are expected to submit a written draft that will be circulated among course participants. This should be work in progress (4000-5000 words), not a finished manuscript. The paper could be an empirically-based analysis, such as work toward a dissertation chapter or article draft. During the course, participants will discuss and receive feedback on pre-circulated drafts from fellow participants, course leaders and guest lectureres. 
Nominal workload:

Organised activities: 30 hours (lectures and seminars)

Individual studies and preparation: 95 hours. 

Participants must expect to use time prior to course start to read the relevant literature.  

Entrance requirements:
Participants should be enrolled in a PhD programme and have a basic understanding of social theory and qualitative research before joining the course. Other backgrounds especially relevant to the topic and the approach of the course might be accepted and will be evaluated on an individual basis. 
Type of course:
5 days of structured education. 
Note:
This course will develop a website in January 2023 at the latest with more information about how to apply and the programme. You will find the link to the course on Noragric's website: News archive | NMBU
Examiner:
An external examiner will evaluate the course structure including the required activities specified for the course.
Examination details: Portfolio: Passed / Not Passed