News

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale

Findings will help wildlife managers track and predict the dynamics of large carnivore populations.

The fight against stem rot is well underway

The fight against stem rot is well underway

Stem rot costs the Norwegian society many millions of kroner every year. In a large, international research project, industry and research have come together to fight its occurrence and consequences, and the work is well on its way.

Tall timber buildings

Tall timber buildings

Seminar where we present the latest research on tall timber buildings, with specific focus on user perspectives, policy and future prospects. 

Shifting to small-scale renewable energy technologies can reduce climate gas emissions in Ethiopia

Shifting to small-scale renewable energy technologies can reduce climate gas emissions in Ethiopia

In his PhD, Yibeltal Tebikew Wassie has examined the effects of access to modern and renewable energy sources and technologies on the rural households in southern Ethiopia. His results show that small-scale renewable energy technologies have considerable potential for reducing household consumption of traditional fuels; thereby lessening forest degradation and carbon dioxide emissions.

Lake Detective: The hunt for the lakes of the past

Lake Detective: The hunt for the lakes of the past

Algae blooms in lakes are a common sight, especially in summer. An NMBU researcher is digging into the past to find out if climate change and human activities affect the occurrence of algae in lakes.

Improving the basis for forest management decisions in Ethiopia

Improving the basis for forest management decisions in Ethiopia

In his PhD, Zerihun Asrat Kutie has assessed options for quantifying tree and forest resources of the dry Afromontane forests in south-central Ethiopia. His study has provided models and data and evaluated alternative methods and application of some remotely sensed data to improve estimations of forest parameters. The result is better forest management decision-making.

Sustainable bioeconomy vital for freshwater resources

Sustainable bioeconomy vital for freshwater resources

If the bioeconomy with its utilisation of renewable land-based biomass does not develop in a sustainable way, the alterations of the rural landscape, in combination with expected climate change, will seriously affect our freshwater resources.

NMBU’s Professor emerita Brit Salbu knighted

NMBU’s Professor emerita Brit Salbu knighted

“The knighthood is a major recognition of Salbu’s fantastic effort in the service of science over several decades. Salbu’s research has been decisive in shaping better risk assessments tied to radioactive radiation and environmental toxins,” says NMBU Rector Sjur Baardsen.

Making better use of non-invasive data in carnivore monitoring

Making better use of non-invasive data in carnivore monitoring

In her PhD, Mahdieh Tourani has optimized statistical methods for use of non-invasive approaches to wildlife monitoring, such as camera trapping and genetic sampling. She has used hierarchical analytical models to overcome challenges related to carnivore monitoring, including data sparsity and imperfect observations.

The coconut conundrum – not so eco-friendly after all

The coconut conundrum – not so eco-friendly after all

Coconut oil is often hailed as an environmentally friendly alternative to, for example, palm oil, but new research shows that it actually threatens more species than the controversial palm oil. How to choose environmentally friendly vegetable oils in a world full of disinformation?

Power-line clearings in Norwegian forests are important habitats for wild bees

Power-line clearings in Norwegian forests are important habitats for wild bees

Mari Steinert shows in her PhD that power line clearings in forest landscapes are valuable habitats for plants and wild bees. Her results also show that only minor management measures are needed to make them even more attractive to the insects.

Data from airborne laser scanning and digital aerial photogrammetry reveals new possibilities for estimating forest productivity

Data from airborne laser scanning and digital aerial photogrammetry reveals new possibilities for estimating forest productivity

Lennart Noordermeer has developed methods to predict, estimate and map the magnitude of timber production at sub-stand level automatically over large areas. His PhD shows that site index can be estimated by combining 3D data from two points in time with unprecedented accuracy and at a lower cost than conventional methods.

Developing better models for assessing the potential for wind energy projects

Developing better models for assessing the potential for wind energy projects

In his PhD thesis, Pablo Durán has developed a novel coupling framework utilizing the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with WindSim’s computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model for wind resource assessments.

Sustainability of agriculture and natural resources under a changing climate

Sustainability of agriculture and natural resources under a changing climate

A new book focusing on the climate impacts on agricultual and natural resource sustainability in Africa has just been published. It addresses some of the key Sustainable Development Goals to guide innovative responses and enhanced adaptation methods for coping with climate change.

How much would you pay for nature?

How much would you pay for nature?

How do you value nature? And how do you get hundreds of people to put a price on it? It turns out that warm weather, a cool drink and some persistence might just do the trick: PhD candidate Bart Immerzeel tells the story of his fairy tale field work in the northern countries. 

NMBU-professor gives TED-talk about insects and their importance for our world

NMBU-professor gives TED-talk about insects and their importance for our world

Professor Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson's TEDx talk on insects and how important they are to the globe and human life is now on Youtube.

Elusive species: how to find animals that are rarely seen?

Elusive species: how to find animals that are rarely seen?

Knowledge is vital in order to preserve rare and endangered species. But how do you count that which is rarely seen? Researchers at NMBU have created a new method that gives better estimates of wildlife populations.

Stressed tropical forests will soon be releasing more carbon than they absorb

Stressed tropical forests will soon be releasing more carbon than they absorb

Tropical forests have been considered an important buffer against anthropogenic climate change. Scientists have followed 300 000 trees in Africa and the Amazon for 30 years, and their results show that the ability of these forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is diminishing rapidly.

NMBU-professor on advisory board for large Ghanaian development project

NMBU-professor on advisory board for large Ghanaian development project

NMBU’s professor Sam Adaramola is newly appointed member of the International Scientific Advisory Board for the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Engineering Education Project (KEEP) in Ghana. KEEP is a vital part of Ghana’s industrial and digital revolution within engineering sciences.

The lichen-water relationship: new insights into lichen ecology

The lichen-water relationship: new insights into lichen ecology

Nathan Phinney’s doctoral work provides new insight into how lichens respond to water, both at an individual level, and at an ecological scale.

New director of CERAD: Deborah Oughton

New director of CERAD: Deborah Oughton

Professor Deborah Oughton stepped up as new director of CERAD on 1 February 2020. She sees a bright future and many new interesting research questions for the centre.

Nematodes are negatively affected by chronic exposure to radiation

Nematodes are negatively affected by chronic exposure to radiation

Erica Maremonti has in her doctorate examined how nematodes are affected by gamma radiation. Her results show that even these radioresistant organisms can be negatively affected by chronic exposure. This is due to higher sensitivity of certain developmental stages, cell types and molecular functions.

The panda diet: how to survive on only bamboo?

The panda diet: how to survive on only bamboo?

Ever wondered how the giant panda, a bear, can live its life eating only plants? Wednesday 29 January, there will be an open seminar about the giant panda and its ecophysiology. Professor John Speakman will present some of his findings, trying to explain how this species, despite the odds, can survive on bamboo. 

Quiz Masters of Tourism Management awarded

Quiz Masters of Tourism Management awarded

Each fall, the class in the course "Tourism management" awards its top participants in the class quizzes. 

Seminar: Lichen ecology

Seminar: Lichen ecology

Thursday 6 February, 2020, there will be an open seminar about lichen ecology. All are welcome. 

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