AntiMast: Bacteriocins as alternatives to antibiotics for combating infections in veterinary medicine

AntiMast: Bacteriocins as alternatives to antibiotics for combating infections in veterinary medicine

Goat

We aim to develop novel antimicrobial products based on our patented bacteriocins, for effective treatment and prevention of mastitis and listeriosis in domestic animals like cows and goats.

prosjekt

About/Aims
Background

New infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are an increasing problem in both human and veterinary medicine. In agriculture, mastitis and listeriosis are painful diseases with high mortality rates, often caused by bacterial infections not efficiently treated with traditional  antibiotics.

Mastitis is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is the animal disease leading to the greatest milk production loss worldwide. The disease costs the dairy industry in Norway 245 million NOK per year and upwards of USD 2 billion per year in the United States. Listeriosis is caused by the ingestion of low quality feed contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, and may lead to huge economic losses due to infected animals and the retraction of contaminated feed.

Technology/Advantage
We have recently isolated new peptides, known as bacteriocins, from probiotic bacteria. These bacteriocins exhibit antibacterial effects on a range of pathogenic bacterial strains and their drug-resistant derivatives. Our results so far show that these bacteriocins are effective in combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from mastitis infections. We have successfully developed a prototype formulation that efficiently kills Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a mouse infection model.

Objectives

Development plans
The technology will be further developed through this 2-year FORNY2020 project, funded by the Norwegian Research Council. The overall goal of the project is to develop novel antimicrobial products based on our patented bacteriocins, for effective treatment and prevention of mastitis and listeriosis in domestic animals like cows and goats. We will continue to develop the prototype formulation and do efficiency studies in field trials with a bovine mastitis model, and a goat listeriosis model.