Course code SDP416

SDP416 Critical realism in environment, development and planning studies

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Showing course contents for the educational year 2022 - 2023 .

Course responsible: Jin Xue
ECTS credits: 5
Faculty: Faculty of Landscape and Society
Teaching language: EN
(NO=norsk, EN=Engelsk)
Limits of class size:
Minimum 5, maximum 20
Teaching exam periods:
05-06/2023
Course frequency: Every second year
First time: Study year 2019-2020
Preferential right:
PhD students from the Faculty of Landscape and Society at NMBU are prioritized.
Course contents:

The aim of this PhD course is to provide opportunity for doctoral students to develop their knowledge of critical realism as a contribution to their overall meta-theoretical reflections. Apart from giving a general introduction to critical realism, the course will place particular emphasis on the following topics: interdisciplinary research, the application of critical realism in research, its methodological implications and its potentials as a base for ideology critique.

A considerable part of the course will be devoted to discussion of papers written by the participants. In order to be able to write the papers, it is important to start reading the required reading of the course early. Reading the required literature before the course starts is also important in order to have good discussions during the course.

Learning outcome:
After having completed the course, the Ph.D. students will possess a good knowledge of the philosophy of science position of critical realism and its relevance to environment, development and planning studies. The course will  enable the Ph.D. students to reflect on the application of critical realism in research, including its methodological implications and its potentials as a base for ideology critique.
Learning activities:
Lectures, seminars, writing and presentation of a scholarly paper
Teaching support:
-
Syllabus:

Bhaskar, R. (2008). A Realist Theory of Science, pp. 21-62. London and New York: Routledge.

Bhaskar, R. (2009). Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation, pp. 103-136. London and New York: Routledge.

Bhaskar, R. & Danermark, B. (2006). Metatheory, Interdisciplinarity and Disability Research: A Critical Realist Perspective. Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, 8(4), pp. 278-297.

Danermark, B.; Ekström, M.; Jakobsen, L. & Karlsson, J.  (2002): Explaining Society, pp. 15-114 and 150-176. London/New York: Routledge.

Fairclough, N., Jessop, R. & Sayer, A. (2002). Critical realism and semiosis. Journal of Critical Realism, 1, pp. 2-10.

Næss, P. (2015). Critical Realism, Urban Planning and Urban Research. European Planning Studies, 23 (6), pp. 1228-1244.

Næss, P. (2015). Built Environment, Causality and Travel. Transport Reviews, 35 (3), pp. 275-291.

Næss, P. (2016). Built Environment, Causality and Urban Planning. Planning Theory & Practice, 17(1), pp. 52-71.

Skrede, J. & Hølleland, H. (2018). Uses of Heritage and beyond: Heritage Studies viewed through the lens of Critical Discourse Analysis and Critical Realism. Journal of Social Archaeology, 18(1), pp. 77-96

Steffansen, R. (2016). Critical Realist Methodology Guiding Theory Development: The Case of the Norwegian Second Home Ownership Paradox. Journal of Critical Realism, 15(2), pp. 122-141.

Xue, J. (2022). A critical realist theory of ideology: Promoting planning as a vanguard of societal transformation. Planning Theory, 14730952211073330.

Prerequisites:
Master education in planning, landscape architecture, property/property development, public health science, environment and development studies, or other relevant subject with the grade C or better. The course must be part of an approved existing PhD program.
Recommended prerequisites:
It is recommended that participants have prior to the course completed the course SDP415 Theory of science for environment, development and planning studies.
Mandatory activity:
Submission and presentation of a scholarly paper; commenting on 1-2 of the papers submitted by other course participants; attendance at no less than 80 % of the lectures and seminars.
Assessment:
Combined assessment and submission of a scholarly paper
Nominal workload:
5 ECTS (125 hours)
Entrance requirements:
Master education in planning, landscape architecture, property/property development, public health science, environment and development studies, or other relevant subject with the grade C or better. The course must be part of an approved existing PhD program.
Reduction of credits:
None
Type of course:
35.5 hours
Note:
The course will only be held if at least 5 participants are enrolled
Examiner:
To be decided.
Examination details: Portfolio: Passed / Not Passed