Course code KJM120

KJM120 Inorganic Chemistry

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Showing course contents for the educational year starting in 2014 .

Course responsible: Deborah Helen Oughton
Teachers: Karl Steinar Andreas Jensen, Solfrid Lohne
ECTS credits: 10
Faculty: Department of Environmental Sciences
Teaching language: NO
(NO=norsk, EN=Engelsk)
Teaching exam periods:
This course starts in Spring parallel. This course has teaching/evaluation in Spring parallel, .
Course frequency: Annually
First time: 2004V
Preferential right:
B-KJEMI, B-MINA, B-BIOTEK, M-LUN,M-KM
Course contents:
Lectures: The textbook is the students point of departure. It gives an overview over inorganic chemistry so that a thermodynamic approach (to as large an extent as possible) forms the basis for an understanding of stability and reaction conditions. The course focuses on naturally occurring processes in the biogeochemical cycle. Colloquia: Problem-solving on the chemistry of the elements, affinity relationships and periodical variations in the physical and chemical properties, in order to promote an understanding of the connections between composition, structure and properties. Laboratory exercises: An aim for the exercises is to give students practical experience with the chemistry of the most important elements in the form of simple experiments that are evaluated and discussed. The exercises do not nearly cover the field of inorganic reaction chemistry, which also comprises reactions in non-aqueous environments, reactions taking place at high temperatures, high pressures, reactions in a crucible and crystallisation, as well as electrochemical reactions. In addition, inorganic chemistry is more than reactions, their mechanisms, energetics and kinetics. It is the structural chemistry of gases, liquids and solids, the latter being molecular, glass-like or crystalline that is studied by the use of spectral, diffraction, magnetic, electric, optic or other methods. But the trends in the periodic system remain the same, whether one works in an aqueous solution or uses high-temperature synthesis. Another aim of the laboratory exercises is chemical problem-solving. The writing of a laboratory journal is not the classical journal writing with detailed descriptions, but an argument led by certain given questions.
Learning outcome:
The student is to have an overview over inorganic chemistry so that a thermodynamic approach (to as large an extent as possible) forms the foundation for the understanding of stability and reaction conditions. Knowledge of the chemistry of the elements, affinity conditions and periodic variations in physical and chemical properties and an understanding of the connections between composition, structure and properties. Insight into the chemistry of the elements based on elementary knowledge and understanding of the principles that explain the existence and chemical behaviour of the elements and with this insight be able to link inorganic chemistry with other natural scientific subject fields (e.g. geology, environmental chemistry, environmental physics, microbiology). The course focuses on naturally occurring processes in the biogeochemical cycle, and in this way satisfies the environmental profile of UMB.
Learning activities:
Inorganic chemistry is an experience-based subject where lectures, colloquia and laboratory exercises are central. The lectures are to form the foundation for a theoretical approach so that a thermodynamic viewpoint (to as large an extent as possible) is made the basis for an understanding of stability and reaction conditions. The colloquia (where the teacher is present) take selected examples as their point of departure, and give room for reflections and discussions. The laboratory exercises give the traditional approach. Through practical experience, calculation exercises and the writing of reports, the chemistry of the elements is linked with basic principles and theoretical knowledge of affinity relationships and periodical variations of physical and chemical properties and a further understanding of the connections between composition, structure and properties. The deadline for submitting laboratory reports is one week after the exercise has been carried out.
Teaching support:
The students are free to make appointments for discussions with both the lecturer and the technical staff. The deadline for submitting laboratory reports is one week after the exercise has been carried out. An appointment to discuss improvements of the reports will be offered to every student individually, even reports that have been approved.
Syllabus:
English textbook: SRayner-Canham and Overton Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. 5th Ed. OWH Freedman: ISBN 1-4292-1814-6 . Supporting literature: Kofstad, P. 1992 Uorganisk kjemi. En innføring i grunnstoffenes kjemi. 3rd edition. Tano.
Prerequisites:
KJM100 General Chemistry.
Recommended prerequisites:
Mandatory activity:
Approved journal; 7 laboratory exercises. Compulsory meeting at first lecture
Assessment:
Final written exam (3.5 hours).
Nominal workload:
Lectures 30 hours, discussion groups: 18 hours, laboratory exercises: 42 hours, report writing: 56 hours, self-tuition: 154 hours, a total workload of 300 hours.
Entrance requirements:
Special requirements in Science
Reduction of credits:
-
Type of course:
Lectures: 2-4 hours per week (about 30 hours in all). Discussion groups: 2 hours per week (about 18 hours in all). Laboratory exercises: 6 hours (1 day) per week (about 42 hours in all).
Note:
First lecture is compulsory for registration for the laboratory course. Lab.exercises in two groups á 15 students, maximum 30 students. Course responsible will do the prioritization.
Examiner:
The examiner will be involved in the planning, revision and approval of the exam questions of the course.
Allowed examination aids: Calculator handed out, other aids as specified
Examination details: One written exam: A - E / Ikke bestått