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Gendered perspectives of climatic and non-climatic stressors in Ethiopia

  • Borana women farmers and their children

    Borana women farmers and their children.

    Photo
    International Livestock Research Institute via flickr/CC 2.0

Climate is perceived as the most frequent and impactful source of stress in Borana, southern Ethiopia followed by economic stress, according to a new Noragric study by Abiyot Eliyas Anbacha & Darley Kjosavik. 

Gendered perspectives of climatic and non-climatic stressors in Ethiopia

Women are more anxious about these stressors than men, and bear a disproportionate burden of the impact of stressors, resulting from existing inequalities in resource endowments and the traditional labour division.

Gendered perspectives of climatic and non-climatic stressors in Borana, southern Ethiopia

Pastoralism in east Africa is experiencing numerous challenges emanating from climate and non-climatic stressors affecting the people in different ways. This study explored types of major stressors and the gendered perceptions of the impact and severity of stressors in Borana, southern Ethiopia. Data was collected from household survey, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Challenges to pastoral livelihood were categorized in terms of climate, environment, social, economic, governance and conflict. Regardless of livelihood basis, age, gender and wealth status, all participants perceived climate stressors as the most frequent and impactful stressors, followed by economic stressors. Further analysis revealed women are more anxious about climatic and economic stressors, while men give more attention to governance and conflict-related stressors owing to their traditional responsibilities. Similarly, women bear a disproportionate burden of the impact of stressors, resulting from existing inequalities in resource endowments and the traditional labour division. Therefore, nuanced understanding of the differential impacts of stressors is vital for appropriate adaptation polices.

Read more in the Journal of Arid Environments

Published 10. April 2019 - 14:54 - Updated 10. April 2019 - 14:54