2 of 4 grants from Habitat Norway go to International Relations students

Habitat Norway is a Norwegian non-governmental organization, established in 1988, with the overall aim to promote the interest and awareness of global urban challenges and settlement issues.

2 out of 4 grants to students of Noragric’s International Relations. What’s your secret?

“The process of developing the Master thesis topic begins early in our program - and that might have been an advantage for these students. It meant they were prepared when the call for applications to the grant was announced”, says Stuvøy.

She continues, “They also have useful language skills relevant to the specific context of their projects. They attended one of the elective courses in our Master program in International Relations (Global Transitions and the City) and used this to explore ideas for their Master thesis during their first year of study with us”.

For students and grant receivers Tore Øvstebø Næss and Elina Turbina, the grant could be the one factor that makes elements such as practical field work possible.

“This will be incredibly helpful with the expenses my fieldwork might have”, Turbina explains.

If the visa processing issues between Russia and Norway clear up, she will be going to Russia for her fieldwork.

Næss is planning to go to Brazil for his field work.

Tore Næss

Tore Næss

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“My master thesis project is essentially about violence in and of cities. This has been identified as a literature gap in IR by some scholars, and I am curious to investigate it. For those who know me well, I cannot stop talking about Rio de Janeiro. Rio is a beautiful city but with severe challenges when it comes to violence, poverty and inequality. The aim of my study is to examine urban violence and its different dimensions, and analyse these in light of global development and with capitalism as a global process. In order to investigate this, I will draw on traditional IR literature and combine it with concepts and insights from other social science disciplines, which have been far better to embrace the violence concept. Further, I also hope to go to Rio de Janeiro to do fieldwork, early next year. However, I am also prepared to collect the project’s primary data digitally since there is still uncertainty around covid-19 and how it will evolve the coming months,” he says.

Turbina’s project focuses on the small Russian monotown Nikel, which is located right by the Norwegian border and has strong ties to its twinned town Kirkenes.

Elina Turbina

Elina Turbina

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“Nikel is also exciting as it is a post-socialist town operated by one of the world’s leading companies in nickel and palladium production - NorNickel. This company is, in large part, responsible for this big urban transformation happening in Nikel. In my research, I want to see what this transformation entails, what it means for the town and its inhabitants, compare it with the rhetoric of NorNickel and the local government, and figure out how this transition contributes to our understanding of global change. Basically, I want to know if this fascinating change is helping Nikel systematically”, Turbina explains.

Writing applications for grants is an important part of an academic career. Stuvøy encourages other students to work on their application writing skills, and the NMBU Writing Center is accessible to students asking for advice on different kinds of writing assignments.

“You need to write a grant application and try your luck! The relevance of your project, the plans you have and how they are presented are important. You can learn how to write a good application – talk to your supervisor and try it!”

 

Published 29. October 2021 - 12:29 - Updated 3. November 2021 - 8:43