New Causation in Science module

The CauSci team teaches a 300-module at UMB on Causation in Science. The course gives 5 credits and is open for all students interested in the philosophical and methodological foundations of science.

Teaching

 The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez.
The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez. Photo: Hkon Sparre


PHI302 CAUSATION IN SCIENCE

 Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course.
Photo: Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course.


Time: Wednesdays 14-16
Place: Tårnbygningen T331

Causation is a key concept in all empirical sciences. Our methods tell us what counts as causal evidence and our theories are about causal explanation and prediction. The ultimate scientific aim is to understand and influence the world around us. But in order to do this what we need to know is what causes what. While scientists deal with the concrete details, it is philosophers who consider in the abstract what it is for one thing to cause another. The aim of this course is to bring together that abstract philosophical approach to causation with a more concrete understanding of the work actually undertaken by the practitioners of the sciences.

We will look at how causation is understood by philosophers, but also what existing scientific methods are assuming about causation. In this sense, at least, our research is defined and guided by conceptual and methodological assumptions. This course will encourage and fascilitate a critical reflection upon some of these assumptions through lectures and discussions.

Suggested background reading for the course is Causation - A very short introduction.

Selected topics

  • Do we need causation in science?
  • Should science construct theories?
  • How much data do we need to establish causation?
  • Is evidence of causation based on causation?
  • Same cause, same effect?
  • How to interpret statistical data
  • Do causes make a difference?
  • What is the external validity of RCTs?
  • Understanding causation by way of failure
  • The causal power of organisation


Teachers

Rani Lill Anjum
Elias Nunez
Fredrik Andersen
Stephen Mumford

Formalities:
Credits: 5
Teaching form: seminars with lectures and discussions, 2 hours a week
Exam: written assignment
Language: English
Registration deadline: 1 February

Course responsible: Rani Lill Anjum

This course is organised by CauSci and the School of Economics and Business.

Published 16. June 2014 - 14:25 - Updated 23. May 2017 - 19:35

 The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez.
The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez. Photo: Hkon Sparre

PHI302 CAUSATION IN SCIENCE
 Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course.
Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course. Photo:


Time: Wednesdays 14-16
Place: Tårnbygningen T331

Causation is a key concept in all empirical sciences. Our methods tell us what counts as causal evidence and our theories are about causal explanation and prediction.

The ultimate scientific aim is to understand and influence the world around us. But in order to do this what we need to know is what causes what.

While scientists deal with the concrete details, it is philosophers who consider in the abstract what it is for one thing to cause another. The aim of this course is to bring together that abstract philosophical approach to causation with a more concrete understanding of the work actually undertaken by the practitioners of the sciences.

We will look at how causation is understood by philosophers, but also what existing scientific methods are assuming about causation. In this sense, at least, our research is defined and guided by conceptual and methodological assumptions. This course will encourage and fascilitate a critical reflection upon some of these assumptions through lectures and discussions.

Suggested background reading for the course is Causation - A very short introduction.

Selected topics

  • Do we need causation in science?
  • Should science construct theories?
  • How much data do we need to establish causation?
  • Is evidence of causation based on causation?
  • Same cause, same effect?
  • How to interpret statistical data
  • Do causes make a difference?
  • What is the external validity of RCTs?
  • Understanding causation by way of failure
  • The causal power of organisation
Photo:


Teachers

Rani Lill Anjum
Elias Nunez
Fredrik Andersen
Stephen Mumford

Formalities:

Credits: 5
Teaching form: seminars with lectures and discussions, 2 hours a week
Exam: written assignment
Language: English
Registration deadline: 1 February

Course responsible: Rani Lill Anjum

This course is organised by CauSci and the UMB School of Economics and Business.

Published 11. June 2014 - 14:15 - Updated 23. May 2017 - 19:35

 The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez.
The CauSci team (from left): Fredrik Andersen, Rani Lill Anjum, Elias Nunez. Photo: Hkon Sparre

PHI302 CAUSATION IN SCIENCE
 Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course.
Stephen Mumford, Professor of Philosophy (Nottingham and UMB) will be a guest lecturer on the course. Photo:


Time: Wednesdays 14-16
Place: Tårnbygningen T331

Causation is a key concept in all empirical sciences. Our methods tell us what counts as causal evidence and our theories are about causal explanation and prediction.

The ultimate scientific aim is to understand and influence the world around us. But in order to do this what we need to know is what causes what.

While scientists deal with the concrete details, it is philosophers who consider in the abstract what it is for one thing to cause another. The aim of this course is to bring together that abstract philosophical approach to causation with a more concrete understanding of the work actually undertaken by the practitioners of the sciences.

We will look at how causation is understood by philosophers, but also what existing scientific methods are assuming about causation. In this sense, at least, our research is defined and guided by conceptual and methodological assumptions. This course will encourage and fascilitate a critical reflection upon some of these assumptions through lectures and discussions.

Suggested background reading for the course is Causation - A very short introduction.

Selected topics

  • Do we need causation in science?
  • Should science construct theories?
  • How much data do we need to establish causation?
  • Is evidence of causation based on causation?
  • Same cause, same effect?
  • How to interpret statistical data
  • Do causes make a difference?
  • What is the external validity of RCTs?
  • Understanding causation by way of failure
  • The causal power of organisation
Photo:


Teachers

Rani Lill Anjum
Elias Nunez
Fredrik Andersen
Stephen Mumford

Formalities:

Credits: 5
Teaching form: seminars with lectures and discussions, 2 hours a week
Exam: written assignment
Language: English
Registration deadline: 1 February

Course responsible: Rani Lill Anjum

This course is organised by CauSci and the UMB School of Economics and Business.

Published 11. June 2014 - 13:39 - Updated 23. May 2017 - 19:35

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU)

Contact us

Contact info

Click above to find
specific contact info.

Visit us